THIRD CENTENARY OF THE BIRTH OF CARLO GOLDONI - Leaflet

THIRD CENTENARY OF THE BIRTH OF CARLO GOLDONI - Leaflet  

Carlo Goldoni was born to a middle class family in Venice, Italy, on 25 February 1707. He led a restless childhood, being forced to study law by his family even though he was really interested in theatre with a special preference for the great comic actors. Beginning with the first plays he wrote, Goldoni brought about an authentic revolution in the theatre world by replacing scripted scenes with ones in which actors were free to improvise dialogues, monologues, comedy and stage movements - a complete script of its own with all roles filled. His stage success followed one theatrical season after another, beginning in 1748 with plays which were to mark the history of Italian theatre. Among them were The Coffee House, The Innkeeper, Comic Theatre, The Venetian Quarrels, Il Campiello (small square) until 1762 when he moved to Paris to direct the theatre of the Comédie Italienne. Goldoni encountered many difficulties in France, given that he faced a demanding public which had already experienced the theatrical reforms of Molière. In 1765 Louis XV had Goldoni go to Versailles to teach Italian and prepare shows. Even though his creative inspiration was fading, Goldoni made a great comeback composing in French his last masterpiece, The Benevolent Curmudgeon, where in 1771 it was performed at the "Comédie Française" and became a resounding success. Unfortunately, little financial benefit came from the author's works and the French Revolution radically changed the panorama, forcing Carlo Goldoni into poverty until he died in early February of 1793.