V CENTENARY OF THE BIRTH OF ANDREA PALLADIO (Leaflet)

V CENTENARY OF THE BIRTH OF ANDREA PALLADIO (Leaflet)  

Son of miller, Andrea was born in Padua in 1508. In Padua, the town of the saint, he gained his first experiences as a stonecutter in the sculpture workshop of Bartolomeo Cavazza da Sossano, who is said to have imposed particularly hard working conditions. In fact, in 1524, after one failed attempt, Palladio managed to run away to Vicenza. There he started working in the workshops of some of the most well known sculptors of the time. Between 1535 and 1538 something happened which would radically change his life. He met Giangiorgio Trissino, a poet and humanist, who took him under his wing. He gave him the nickname Palladio and guided him through his cultural education, based mainly on studies of classical buildings. His studies included several visits to Rome and there Andrea found himself for the first time face to face with the architecture he had learnt to love. He could see the imperial monuments with his own eyes, appreciate their beauty, study the materials and building techniques employed, as well as their spatial relationships. Around 1540 he started his own architecture business and in 1549 a project began which definitely marked his fame - the reconstruction of the loggias of the Basilica in Vicenza. From that point onwards the noble families of Vicenza and Venice competed for Palladio’s works. His most intense working period began in which artworks of great beauty came to life. Some of these works, like the Venetian church of San Giorgio Maggiore and the famous Villa Rotonda, are depicted on the stamps with the architectural plans and layouts (by Bertotti Scamozzi, 1783 and 1778). The miniature sheet shows Villa Valmarana, taken from the “Four Books of Architecture by Andrea Palladio” of 1570. Between February and March 1580 work started on the construction of the Teatro Olimpico, a place for the performance of classic tragedies, but before the project could be completed, Palladio died on 19 August 1580. After his death his works inspired an authentic architectural revolution, which changed the face of Europe and later crossed the ocean to characterise American architecture.