Music Day Handel (1685-1759) Haydn (1732-1809) Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847)

Music Day Handel (1685-1759) Haydn (1732-1809) Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847)  

It is not a simple task to find a common thread linking these three great composers. While Handel and Haydn were both part of the classical period and therefore contemporaries, Mendelssohn-Bartholdy was instead one of the most important composers of romanticism. Handel is considered one of the greatest Baroque musicians. After his work as musical director for the Court of Hanover, he moved to London where he founded the Royal Academy of Music and for whom he composed various works. Later his musical work focused on oratorios, which were believed to be the highest form of his artistic expression, as in his most famous work The Messiah with its Hallelujah chorus. His work not only had a decisive influence on his contemporaries, but also on future generations of composers, among them Haydn, considered to be the “father” of symphony and especially the string quartet. Haydn died in 1809, the same year Mendelssohn-Bartholdy was born. A very talented pianist, Mendelssohn wrote his first twelve symphonies as an adolescent, and at the age of only 17, he composed the overture for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, perhaps his most successful work. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy was greatly influenced by Bach, who was not particularly appreciated at the time, and Mendelssohn helped him become more widely known among the public and reconsidered by the critics. For the first time ever, the Philatelic and Numismatic Office has produced a CD with a selection of musical works by each composer. Enclosed in the CD package is also the series of stamps dedicated to the three great artists.